The Real European Question: Greece, the Euro, and a More Perfect Union

The real question in the Greek debt crisis is not whether Greece will leave the Euro but whether, and how, the European Union can survive

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Afghanistan: A Decade of Progress and Hope?

I met Taymor Kamrany in 2003, just over a year after the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan had ousted the Taliban. We were both in Kabul, working on a USAID program to improve the environment for business and help government institutions rebuild their capacity to support a market economy. It was not an easy task.

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Dealing with Nigeria’s Jihadist Threat

About 10 days ago I sat at breakfast in Lomé, the capital of Togo, a sliver of a country in West Africa, watching French TV news of the capture, and what turned out to be false reports of the liberation, of seven French tourists in northern Cameroon by the Nigerian radical Islamist group Boko Haram. It was hard not to feel concerned about the future of this part of the world.

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Obama’s Great Sequester Plan

Jeffrey Sachs, writing in yesterday’s Financial Times, has neatly identified the culprit in the U.S. fiscal sequester, which went into effect at noon today. It is not the Tea Party, nor even the House Republican leadership, but Obama himself, counterintuitive as that may appear.

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Arming the Syrian Rebels Would Be a Terrible Mistake

After watching from the sidelines for nearly two years, many of the world’s political and opinion leaders are now calling for the West to supply arms to the Syrian rebels. British Prime Minister David Cameron has spoken of a “strategic imperative” to act, at least in part to prevent extreme jihadist groups from eclipsing more moderate factions.

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