The Death of Aleppo and the Triumph of the Assads

the death of Aleppo, the Syrian civil war nears its end. It has been proposed that the U.S. and Russia cooperate to force an end to the fighting and try to save what is left of the country. It’s long overdue.

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Old Dictators Never Fade Away

Congo Brazzaville dictator Denis Sassou Nguesso, just re-elected for a sixth term, is typical of the genre, an old, and immensely wealthy, dictator who won’t just fade away

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African Business Success is a Long-term Proposition

Impressive returns may await those who approach Africa with a long-term view

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Indonesia’s “Fragile” Religious Peace Is Stronger than it Appears

Indonesia’s religious peace has resisted Saudi influence to remain stronger and more tolerant than many in the West fear.

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The Magnanimity of Despots and the Fall of the House of Bongo

Ali Bongo has just promised to give a tiny sliver of his fortune to the people of Gabon. It is probably too little, too late.

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The Real European Question: Greece, the Euro, and a More Perfect Union

The real question in the Greek debt crisis is not whether Greece will leave the Euro but whether, and how, the European Union can survive

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The Entrepreneurial State, or, You Didn’t Build That

President Obama received a lot of outraged criticism from the right during the 2012 campaign for his remark, “You didn’t build that.” What he meant, though he uncharacteristically said it in a fairly clumsy way, was that for every proudly self-made entrepreneur there is a huge web of supporting institutions and infrastructure built by the government.

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Afghanistan: A Decade of Progress and Hope?

I met Taymor Kamrany in 2003, just over a year after the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan had ousted the Taliban. We were both in Kabul, working on a USAID program to improve the environment for business and help government institutions rebuild their capacity to support a market economy. It was not an easy task.

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Dealing with Nigeria’s Jihadist Threat

About 10 days ago I sat at breakfast in Lomé, the capital of Togo, a sliver of a country in West Africa, watching French TV news of the capture, and what turned out to be false reports of the liberation, of seven French tourists in northern Cameroon by the Nigerian radical Islamist group Boko Haram. It was hard not to feel concerned about the future of this part of the world.

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