Dar es Salaam and Not-so Rapid Transit

Dar es Salaam has built a new rapid bus transit system, but without an intelligent approach to pricing the buses will never run.

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Africa: The Answer to Global Food Security

Africa may hold the answer to the challenge of feeding the planet, and the collapse in oil prices creates a new opportunity to invest in African agribusiness

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Can Kazakhstan Escape the Middle-Income Trap?

Since the break-up of the Soviet Union Kazakhstan has done far better economically than most of the other former Soviet republics, with per capita GDP rising from a little over $1,200 to nearly $14,000. But reaching its stated goal of becoming one of the world’s 30 richest countries by 2050 is far from assured.

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Afghanistan: A Decade of Progress and Hope?

I met Taymor Kamrany in 2003, just over a year after the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan had ousted the Taliban. We were both in Kabul, working on a USAID program to improve the environment for business and help government institutions rebuild their capacity to support a market economy. It was not an easy task.

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Dealing with Nigeria’s Jihadist Threat

About 10 days ago I sat at breakfast in Lomé, the capital of Togo, a sliver of a country in West Africa, watching French TV news of the capture, and what turned out to be false reports of the liberation, of seven French tourists in northern Cameroon by the Nigerian radical Islamist group Boko Haram. It was hard not to feel concerned about the future of this part of the world.

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Romney, Ryan, Foreign Aid and Diplomacy

In these dark days of an ever-widening political divide, it is nice to know there is still something on which Republicans and Democrats can agree: foreign aid. Both sides are against it.

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Hillary’s African Safari: Where Idealism and Realism Collide

It must come as some reassurance to Mitt Romney that he is not the only would-be President who says remarkably silly things while visiting foreign lands. Last month Hillary Clinton, on a tour of sub-Saharan Africa, delivered a speech in Senegal in which she said that the United States would stand up for democracy and universal human rights “even when it might be easier or more profitable to look the other way, to keep the resources flowing.” In a barely veiled dig at China, she added, “Not every partner makes that choice, but we do and we will.”

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New Frontiers: The Rush to Invest in Frontier Markets

If any event could illustrate the fragility of the BRICS conceit, it is the recent blackout in India, which left as many as 600 million people without power for up to two days. More than anything else, it reveals the sorry state of India’s governance.

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